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Craftsman  5 oz. Magnetic Tack Hammer

  Item#  00938101000 | Model#  38101
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 Rating 4.0 | 9 Reviews | Write a review
$7.99
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Specifications & Dimensions

Product Overview:
Item Weight (lbs.): 0.4
Type: Ball peen
Handles:
Handle Length (in.): 11
Handle Type: Standard
Tool Head:
Magnetic Head: Yes
Dimensions and Weight:
Head Weight: 5 oz.

Overview

Ratings & Reviews

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Product Description

Head is drop forged steel, 4-1/4 in. long. Magnetic face holds and sets tacks. Solid driving face. Head weight 5 oz., 10-1/4 in. handle length.

This product is:
  • Available for Gift Wrap
This product comes with:

Added on July 26, 2010

 

Overall, others give this:

9 Reviews Write a review
6 Reviewers (67.0%) would recommend this to a friend.
Overall Rating Breakdown:
5stars
4stars
3stars
2stars
(0)
1stars

Reviewers may have received a benefit, like a sweepstakes entry or rewards program points, in exchange for writing a review.
Those benefits were not conditioned on the positive or negative content of the review.

Most Helpful Reviews

Praise1 found this helpful
tuned944
Apr 6 , 2011
An Old-School Tool That Is Still Functional Today

I like to use this hammer for small tacking work like driving pin nails into the scribe mold I use to trim out the custom cabinets I build. The magnetic face on the head of this beauty is helpful in setting those tacks that have larger heads.

In a world that is dominated by hammers with steel, fiberglass or composite handles, I have found the good old fashioned hickory handle on this hammer very refreshing. The Craftsman Logo is burned right into the handle so you don't have to working about it peeling off and leaving a sticky gooey mesh.

Get it a try - go old-school like me.

Criticism1 found this helpful
redgaterover
Mar 13 , 2012
Poorly machined
Purchased because it is made in USA. Paid a buck more than for foreign made. Thought it was a good deal. Had to return because the face is not square and overall it is poorly machined.Will try another one as soon it is in stock in my area. Disappointed.
 

qoqo

Pontiac, MI

Nov 28 , 2013
via sears.com
Overall
perfect hammer for tiny jobs

The actual hammer looks just like the picture. It is tiny, like a toy. For small jobs, such as hammering a picture hanger, it works much better than regular hammer. Magnetic feature is a plus. My son likes to play with it.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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gwupd989

Shelby, NC

Mar 16 , 2013
via sears.com
Overall
Tack Hammer

Good tack hammer, lite weight and was made in the USA unlike most Craftsman tools made today!

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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Cortland

Detroit, MI

Nov 26 , 2012
via sears.com
Overall
Craftsman magnetic tack hammer

Great Craftsman quality. Bought it for a specific job. It performed excellently.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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redgaterover

Schenectady, NY

Mar 13 , 2012
via sears.com
Overall
Poorly machined

Purchased because it is made in USA. Paid a buck more than for foreign made. Thought it was a good deal. Had to return because the face is not square and overall it is poorly machined.Will try another one as soon it is in stock in my area. Disappointed.


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dkogi

White Hall, AR

Nov 14 , 2011
Overall
Just From The Picture, Not My Idea Of A True Tack Hammer

While I can't say I own this supposed "tack hammer", I've been around professional custom woodworking for 56 years now and was needing a new tack hammer, but this won't do the very first small job I have lined up for it which is only a 5 minute job!  I literally grew up in the custom woodworking business practically from the time I was born, and tack hammers were definitely a significant tool of the trade in those days that really got a hard workout before brad guns came along.  Typically a tack hammer will have a decent magnet laminated onto the smaller end and that end will be round but with extremely sharp 90 degree angles where the head meets the shoulder on the tip, the metal between to the opposite head is often varying sizes of brass (the amount of brass changes the head weight), then there is a hardened tip on the larger end but this tip also has a round shape with 90 degree angles all around the head and zero rounding on the edges.  There is a very good reason for the distinct angles on the hammer heads on each end (the smaller magnetic end as well as the larger driving end), and the purpose of the sharp non-rounded head shoulders is so that you can get up extremely tight to another piece of material and not have the hammer slip off as it strikes the tack (and in the case I'm faced with, any slip when striking will either shatter a large pane of glass or will bang up a very nicely made custom piece of Phillipine Mahogany on the inside of a window glass frame of a gun cabinet made by my father over 60 years ago when custom woodworking with exotic woods was half of his business he ran (in addition to full aviation repair service as an independent business, and one of the very first CAA certified Airframe & Powerplant Aviation Mechanics licensed in this country).  When it came time to install the glass in the door of this exotic wood gun cabinet, he went to all of the craftsmanship trouble of measureing out the glass panes thickness and then ripping mahogany square strips of the exact thickness to fit up against the glass yet fit fully flush with the sideraiils of the door too like nothing was holding the glass in place, and the seams were hidden so well that I never even paid any attention to how the glass was contained until something fell against the lower glass and dislodged the glass out of the door without breaking anything.  It was only after taking everything out of the way and looking closely that I discovered he'd hidden the glass retainer seams by ripping down long 3/16" square stock Phillipine Mahogany strips and then using 1/2" long fine tacks to hold the 3/16" thick strips which fully enclosed the entire perimeter of the glass including up into the corners and held the glass in position with no seams visible unless you got up really close.  While the upper door pane remains intact, the lower pane was shoved out backwards at the bottom as the bottom retainer strip and both side retainer strips pulled out which was part of the intentional design in case either glass was ever broken and the tacks holding were only 5/16" deep into the door rails and could easily be removed yet held the glass in position against most anything except a book falling backwards against the glass (which was enough to dislodge 3 retaining strips completely and then the glass slipped down from behind the top strip still in position).  Now I've got to go back in with some very slightly longer tacks in the center of the 3/16" wide strips and tack the 3 loose strips back solidly in to get the glass back where it dropped out after the mishap, but I'm certain the glass was left where it could be replaced with a minimum amount of disruption to the interior and exterior finish of the cabinet leaving no trace of the repair work, but that also means that I have to drive tacks that are centered 3/32" inwards from the back edge and 3/32" away from the pane of glass around most all of the lower pane.  I rememer how his tack hammers were made and all had sharp edges between the striking pads and brass sides with round striking pads and a sharp 90 degree edge so that you could indeed get up in tight areas just like I'm looking at having to do now!  This semi-square headed tack hammer displayed in the picture also shows so much rounding of the striking tips that there is no way I could work within a 3/32" tolerance without either damaging the wood or breaking the glass, but a true tack hammer like I well recall would have no problem doing that specific job.

Also, I do not recall any tack hammers with only a 5 ounce weight, since there was enough brass in the head to go a minimum of 8 ounces or more, but I could still easily work within a 3/32" tolerance if I had one of his old tack hammers available like back in the days where you could find people doing professional grade woodcraft work to order with hidden seams and hidden retainers where everything just blended together invisibly (you won't find that today in hardwoods....they just glue a 1/64" veneer of real wood on top of fake wood beneath to hide seams and stuff, but once it's damaged then it's almost impossible to restore it "like new" again with the current el-cheapo veneer route and all machine work done with no hands on work.

Long story short here, I thought I might have found a new model tool that would do the job I need to do to make a quick and simple repair on a showpiece of furniture that holds firearms, but just looking at the picture here I'm quickly aware that I'm going to get into a more difficult task tracking down a real brass headed tack hammer made in true tack hammer fashion.  I used to take tack hammers for granted and thought that they would always be made to high quality tool standards, but this one ranks among the 50 cent Buffalo brand stuff that just takes up space and may work once before breaking.  Oh well, I gave it 3 wrenches just because it was listed and didn't want to talk anyone else out of it due to me being picky about the tools I use.

I gave Crafatsman a try here, but this item is not a quality tool or even remotely close and won't accomplish the small task I have lined up, so I'll continue my hunt elsewhere.  I guess my age is showing and I want my old slide rule back again!!!  Oh well, this is the age of disposable tools and disposable furniture and disposablel electronics that is outdated before you can take it out of the box (REALLY!).  The rule of "More's Law" is still holding true in electronics today in processor power doubling every 18 months, and that has been true since the very first integrated chip processors hit the market, and people are throwing phones away so fast now that they almost HAVE to be recycled just to reclaim the 0.004 ounces of gold inside each cell phone, especially on the critical contacts at the main IC chip, and the deal about that much gold per cell phone is factual (grab up 250 cell phones and you have an ounce of gold sitting there which CAN be reclaimed!).  I'm going back to the old vacuum tube days and black and white TV with AM radio and the TV's were so huge that you had to have someone come out to the house to work on 'em like my uncle did for a living (with a massive box of vacuum tubes wherever he went).....if it wasn't a bad tube, check for dirty contactors in the tuner or low voltage was a bad power supply, and the first digital clocks which were electro=methanical clocks with wheels of number cards that flipped over one at a time were still away on the horizon back then and LED displays or LCD displays were decades down the road.  I watched "70's Tech" on Modern Marvels last night again, and I still remember when "Pong" came out and a buddy bought one of the very first tiny red LED display watches that were $300 back in the early '70's which is about $1,400 today, and a fresh Pontiac Firebird was only $3,000 (I liked both the Firebird Formula 400 and the Trans Am Super Duty 455 in those days....the Trans Am SD-455 was only rated at 290 HP for insurance purposes, but it actually put out well over 400 HP right out of the box without any modifications to it.....the T/A SD-455 was fully capable of 0 to 100 in under 10 seconds which would put it right in the running with a 9.90 bracket car at the drag strip today!.....and even the big block Formula 400 was no slouch either!  The Hemi engines had the performance advantage, but any Mopar car would race down the highway shedding body panels, quickly turning into one extremely hot running chassis and engine and drivetrain on wheels!  While I loved to drive the hot factory Mustangs back then, I didn't care to own one since I knew their weak links and it started with the name of the manufacturer who made 'em.  I loved the Mopar performance on their hot stuff, but it would rust out in 3 years, so I stayed with GM back then.  But the tack hammer dates back decades before the "'70's Tech" show.

Time to "Duck And Cover" for me, and scan on down the "hammer" list for another tack hammer if one exists here!  Meanwhile, I'm crawlin' back under a Craftsman logo Pet Rock here!!!!


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TroutAngler

Hampstead, MD

Sep 1 , 2011
Overall
Nice tool

This is a decent lightweight hammer with lots of uses around the house and workshop.  The handle is comfortable and the hammer balances well in my hand.  The magnetic end of the head is useful for picking up small nails that fall on the floor.

I have already used this hammer for several projects around my house like hanging pictures and other small items on the wall as well as in the workshop hammering in finishing nails and small brads. 

I would recommend this hammer to family members and friends if they ever need one.

 

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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tuned944

Floyds Knobs, IN

Apr 6 , 2011
Overall
An Old-School Tool That Is Still Functional Today

I like to use this hammer for small tacking work like driving pin nails into the scribe mold I use to trim out the custom cabinets I build. The magnetic face on the head of this beauty is helpful in setting those tacks that have larger heads.

In a world that is dominated by hammers with steel, fiberglass or composite handles, I have found the good old fashioned hickory handle on this hammer very refreshing. The Craftsman Logo is burned right into the handle so you don't have to working about it peeling off and leaving a sticky gooey mesh.

Get it a try - go old-school like me.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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VintageCraftsman

San Fernando Valley, CA

Mar 2 , 2011
Overall
Useful in small places or spaces

I'll admit I do not necessarily use this as intended. This gets the most use in tool box corners or lids, usually banging out dents where normal hammers would be too big to use. Can't say I have ever used it on a tack, but I like it.

I would recommend this product to a friend.

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GracieSC

Myrtle Beach, SC

Dec 2 , 2009
via sears.com
Overall
Prefered the wooden handle model.

Balance was okay, but preferred the wooden handle version better.  Easier to hang onto the wooden handle.  Magnetic feature not very effective.


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